Learning together across health professions

On the Health Sciences Campus at UMKC, interprofessional education, or IPE, is an important learning tool. It brings together students from dental, medicine, nursing and pharmacy and places them in learning activities focused on team-based patient care. A new video highlights this IPE program and its benefits, filmed during a recent poverty simulation exercise.

The UMKC Health Sciences IPE program is directed by Stefanie Ellison, M.D., associate dean for learning initiatives at the UMKC School of Medicine and emergency physician at Truman Medical Centers; and Valerie Ruehter, Pharm.D., director of experiential learning and clinical associate professor for the UMKC School of Pharmacy.

“We can create individual practitioners, but in health care today, it takes an entire team to create positive patient outcomes,” said Ruehter. “With IPE, we give students the chance to become familiar with what every discipline brings to the table, which hopefully will make a more seamless health care system.”

That’s a goal of IPE, said Ellison. “If we have our students learning in silos, but they are expected on day one in practice to begin working together as a team, then we haven’t really done our job. At UMKC, we are breaking down those silos.”

School of Nursing and Health Studies Achieves High National Ranking Sixth Year in a Row

The University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Nursing and Health Studies ranked No. 18 among the nation’s best online graduate nursing programs of 2018 by U.S. News & World Report, earning at least a Top 25 ranking for the sixth year in a row.

“The School of Nursing and Health Studies faculty, staff and students are to be commended for the achievements in our online nursing programs,” said Ann Cary, dean of the school. “In addition, we are supported by the vice provost for online learning, Devon Cancilla, and his team for efforts to bring the best infrastructure possible to our learning experiences for our students. We are committed to unrelenting quality in programming now and in the future.”

The UMKC School of Nursing and Health Studies is a pioneer in distance-learning programs, offering online advanced degree programs since 2002. The programs offer busy professionals a high-quality but convenient way to further their careers and meet the needs of an evolving health-care system.

Online students are expected to participate in online discussions as if they are present in the classroom. Technology offers multiple modes of communication in real time and asynchronous exchanges. Students also experience on-site learning with faculty and classmates through annual clinical institutes and dissertation work sessions.

UMKC offers a variety of online graduate nursing tracks, including BSN to Doctoral, MSN to Doctoral, master’s degrees and post-masters certificate tracks in the following:

U.S. News began ranking online education in 2012. The categories include faculty credentials and training; student engagement; admissions selectivity; peer reputation; and student services and technology. U.S. News began their data comparisons with more than 500 institutions that had accredited graduate degree programs in nursing. Among the ones that replied, 159 said they offered online graduate nursing programs. The number of online nursing programs is continually growing nationwide.

$8 Million Grant to Tackle Opioid Crisis

The Collaborative to Advance Health Services at the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Nursing and Health Studies, in partnership with the American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry, has been sub-awarded a $8 million dollar grant for two years as part of a $24 million grant from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to support primary-care providers in the prevention and treatment of opioid use disorders.

The grant is in response to national leaders in October declaring America’s opioid epidemic a public-health emergency — a designation typically reserved for natural disasters. At that time, SAMHSA announced a new technical-assistance effort in providing state-of-the-art clinical support to providers and to address preventing, treating and supporting recovery from substance-use disorders with a focus on opioid use disorders.

“This award to address the opioid epidemic in Missouri and other states demonstrates the unfailing commitment of UMKC and its School of Nursing and Health Studies to our citizens in the Kansas City region and the state,” said Ann Cary, dean of the UMKC School of Nursing and Health Studies. “Our uniquely talented professionals and support staff in our Collaborative unit within the school offers unrelenting quality in the provision of health services to our communities, and we are grateful for their enduring talent and leadership.”

The Collaborative to Advance Health Services at UMKC School of Nursing and Health Studies is home to several national-based centers that implement evidence-based clinical practices into substance use and mental health treatment. It will receive $4 million a year for two years. This project is an unprecedented alliance of physician, nurse, allied healthcare and behavioral health organizations with broad national, regional and state networks and technical expertise in preventing, treating and supporting recovery from substance use disorders.

The Collaborative will lead 10 regional Addiction Technology Transfer Centers to leverage well-established state-level relationships to build the national technical-assistance infrastructure using proven implementation strategies, said Holly Hagle, co-director of the Addiction Technology Transfer Center Network, UMKC assistant research professor and principal investigator on the grant for UMKC. Other Collaborative members on the project are Laurie Krom, co-director of the ATTC Network, and Pat Stilen, director of the Mid-America ATTC Network.

“The team members of the Collaborative to Advance Health Services at the UMKC School of Nursing and Health Studies are very excited to do this important work at a time of crisis for the country,” Hagle said. “Our hope is that it will have an impact on the people and communities who are suffering.”

Learning Together Across Health Professions

On the Health Sciences Campus at UMKC, interprofessional education, or IPE, is an important learning tool. It brings together students from dental, medicine, nursing and pharmacy and places them in learning activities focused on team-based patient care. A new video highlights this IPE program and its benefits, filmed during a recent poverty simulation exercise.

The UMKC Health Sciences IPE program is directed by Stefanie Ellison, M.D., associate dean for learning initiatives at the UMKC School of Medicine and emergency physician at Truman Medical Centers; and Valerie Ruehter, Pharm.D., director of experiential learning and clinical associate professor for the UMKC School of Pharmacy.

“We can create individual practitioners, but in health care today, it takes an entire team to create positive patient outcomes,” said Ruehter. “With IPE, we give students the chance to become familiar with what every discipline brings to the table, which hopefully will make a more seamless health care system.”

That’s a goal of IPE, said Ellison. “If we have our students learning in silos, but they are expected on day one in practice to begin working together as a team, then we haven’t really done our job. At UMKC, we are breaking down those silos.”

Success Starts Here

Male nursing student stands in foreground looking down while three female nursing students look at charts and talk to each other in background

Congratulations to the Class of 2017 BSN graduates on their 96.36% third quarter pass rate on the NCLEX-RN Exam!

At UMKC, we not only help prepare students for the future, but we celebrate their achievements. By choosing us, you’re choosing a path towards a successful career in nursing and joining the ranks of our accomplished graduates.

Applications to the accelerated (second degree) and pre-licensure (traditional) BSN programs are now open and are due by January 19.

Live in Kansas? Get In-State Tuition Rate

We offer students in 11 neighboring Kansas counties the same rates as Missouri residents. Kansas residents of Atchison, Douglas, Franklin, Jackson, Jefferson, Johnson, Leavenworth, Miami, Osage, Shawnee and Wyandotte counties are eligible for our in-state tuition rate.