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Dean Ann Cary Represents Academic Nursing on National Health Research Forum Panel

Ann Cary, dean of the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Nursing and Health Studies, is a panelist at the 2017 National Health Research Forum.

Organized by Research!America, the forum will be held Sept. 7 in Washington, D.C. The forum sparks stimulating conversations among top leaders in government, industry, patient advocacy and academia about current issues that could impact the trajectory of medical and health research and innovation. Cary, PhD, MPH, RN, FNAP, FAAN, represents academic nursing on the panel.

With such uncertainty regarding the future of our nation’s scientific enterprise, thought leaders will come together to discuss potential solutions to challenges that could slow the pace of scientific progress.

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A Horse, Of Course

Nursing PhD student Sharon White-Lewis, with Sweet Pea, researches equine therapy for arthritis patients

Sharon White-Lewis earns a fair share of double takes as she’s driving her blue Mini Cooper with Sweet Pea’s head sticking out the passenger window.

“Is that a horse?” employees ask White-Lewis, a Ph.D. student at the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Nursing and Health Studies, when she pulls up to drive-thru windows.

Sure is. Sweet Pea is her 175-pound miniature palomino. At 27 inches tall, this 7 year old attracts smiles and attention most anywhere she goes — especially when she’s wearing sneakers. White-Lewis, director of the Bachelor of Science in Nursing program and an associate professor at Saint Luke’s College of Health Sciences, takes Sweet Pea to hospitals, hospice centers, domestic violence shelters, retirement communities and inpatient mental health facilities for children and adolescents.

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Unlike Any Other in the Nation

UMKC School of Nursing and Health Studies and nine other leading Kansas City health-care institutions team up to create UMKC Health Sciences District

aerial photo of the new UMKC Health District

With a collaboration unlike any other in the nation, many of Kansas City’s leading health-care institutions announced that they have agreed to align more closely to form the UMKC Health Sciences District. The newly created district combines the unique expertise and services of 10 partners to spur research and community outreach in service of the Kansas City region and beyond. Continue reading

SoNHS Collaborates on $3.2 Million NIH Grant to Fund Novel Mobile ICU Recovery Program

Being discharged from an intensive care unit is good news for a patient. Researchers at the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Nursing and Health Studies are working to make sure it stays that way.

Intensive-care unit survivors are often overlooked for follow-up care. But two million of the five million Americans admitted to ICUs annually have or develop acute respiratory failure that often can lead to long-term cognitive, functional and psychological impairments known as post-intensive care syndrome.

Researchers believe a specialized recovery program, delivered in the patient’s home, can reduce the incidence of this syndrome among those discharged from ICUs.  A $3.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute funds the implementation and evaluation of a novel mobile critical-care recovery program by researchers at Indiana University School of Medicine and the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Nursing and Health Studies.

This multidisciplinary research team anticipates that the outcome of this five-year trial could lead to the adoption of mobile critical-care recovery programs that could make a difference in the quality of life for intensive care survivors nationwide.

“This is an opportunity for clinicians to assist ICU survivors with reaching their highest potential of recovery,” said Sue Lasiter, Ph.D., R.N., associate professor at UMKC’s School of Nursing and Health Studies and co-investigator on the grant.

“This program is key for ICU survivors who have a hard time getting transportation to healthcare providers or who don’t feel well enough to travel to an ICU survivor clinic,” Lasiter said. Instead of risking rehospitalization and increased health care costs due to lack of post-hospital care, the mobile critical-care recovery program takes healthcare to the patients where they’re most accessible: At home.

Each patient in the trial will be followed for 12 months, significantly longer than previous studies of ICU survivors. During that year, the mobile care coordinator will visit ICU survivors every two weeks with support from a multidisciplinary team including an ICU physician, a geriatrician, a neuropsychologist and an ICU symptom management nurse. Lasiter is the only nurse member of the support team.

The research team will meet on a weekly basis to develop and continually revise a personalized recovery plan that incorporates patient and caregiver goals. Lasiter says her mobile critical care recovery program has two unique benefits:  the team is composed of critical care specialists who are familiar with the problems these patients frequently encounter; and the team involves the patients as members of their own care- planning team.

“This makes it truly patient-centered,” Lasiter said.

Lasiter joined the UMKC School of Nursing and Health Studies in August 2016 from Indiana University.

“Having a doctoral-level nurse scholar, Dr. Sue Lasiter, as an essential member of this research team affirms the value of an interprofessional approach to researching interventions which can improve care outcomes for our patients,” said Ann Cary, dean of the UMKC School of Nursing and Health Studies.

 

http://info.umkc.edu/news/school-of-nursing-and-health-studies-collaborates-on-3-2-million-nih-grant-to-fund-novel-mobile-icu-recovery-program/

 

UMKC Awarded National Grant: Health Professions and Law Schools Team Up to Help Older Kansas Citians

All University of Missouri-Kansas City health professions schools — the School of Nursing and Health Studies, School of Dentistry, School of Medicine and School of Pharmacy — and the School of Law were awarded a national grant to work together to advocate for older adults at the Don Bosco Senior Center and Reconciliation Services, both located in medically underserved areas in Kansas City.

By the year 2030, the U.S. population age 65 and older will have doubled, making older adults the fastest-growing group in the nation. Yet the vast majority of curriculum for health professions students does not include specific instruction dedicated to the needs of geriatric health. Designed for UMKC advanced practice nursing and graduate medical, dental, pharmacy and law students, the project will focus on enhancing active listening and empathic understanding in preparing student teams to advocate for older adults.

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